The Hazards of Metaphors in Foreign Policy

by Paul R. Pillar Physical, spatial imagery has long been applied to discourse about U.S. foreign policy. During the earlier portion of the Cold War, for example, the image of oozing red paint as representing the advance of communism—somewhat like… Continue Reading  

Authoritarian Symps

by John Feffer In the bad old days of the Cold War, the left and the right used to play a nasty game called “Who’s Your Favorite Dictator?” Right-wing ideologues supported authoritarian leaders like Augusto Pinochet of Chile while left-wing… Continue Reading  

Why the World Is Becoming the Un-Sweden

by John Feffer Imagine an alternative universe in which the two major Cold War superpowers evolved into the United Soviet Socialist States. The conjoined entity, linked perhaps by a new Bering Straits land bridge, combines the optimal features of capitalism… Continue Reading  

Central Asia: Mismanaging Religion

by Sebastien Peyrouse When it comes to religious affairs in Central Asia, authorities are relying on Soviet methods even as they aspire to move away from the Soviet legacy. Religion, especially Islam, is a cultural marker that has reinforced national… Continue Reading  

Fall of the Berlin Wall: Looking Back and Forward

by Robert E. Hunter Twenty-five years ago, on “9/11”—November 9th in European date-notation—the Berlin Wall opened and, it seemed, everything changed. Freedom was no longer just an aspiration across much of Europe but a rising reality. The transformation was so… Continue Reading