Egypt: Tailoring Constitutions for the Ruling Military

by Rana Allam Dictatorships tend to treat the constitution with even less respect than they do their people, changing and amending articles according to their changing wills. Egyptians are no strangers to this fact. Between 1956 and today, Egypt has… Continue Reading  

Does Iran’s Constitution Promote Export of Islamic Revolution?

by Eldar Mamedov Some claims are repeated unchallenged so often that they end up becoming part of the conventional wisdom. Such is the case with the assertion that the Iranian constitution mandates the export of the country’s Islamic revolution and… Continue Reading  

Japan Divided Over Any Revision to Its “Peace Constitution”

by Donald Kirk The overwhelming success of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in the latest elections for members of the Japanese “Diet” — the peculiar word for Japan’s parliament or national assembly — portends hardening of tensions and priorities in Northeast… Continue Reading  

Can Afghan Women’s Achievements Survive the Peace Talks?

by Fatemeh Aman As peace talks between the government of Afghanistan and the Taliban enter a new phase and hopes of reaching a sustainable deal increase, concerns are increasing that gains made by Afghan women over the last decade could… Continue Reading  

Egypt, Arab Sunni Politics, and the US: A Problematic Road Ahead

The bad news about Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi’s expanding constitutional powers in Egypt is the threat of another dictatorship in Egypt. The good news is that normal politics is returning to Egypt after decades of brutal authoritarian regimes. Recent mass… Continue Reading