The U.S. Dilemma in the Middle East Isn’t Really a Dilemma

by Lawrence Wilkerson The Persian Gulf and its entryway, the Strait of Hormuz, have been a cockpit of U.S. strategic interest since President Jimmy Carter declared, in his January 1980 State of the Union address, that “An attempt by any… Continue Reading  

A Crumbling Saudi-Emirati Alliance in Yemen May Change U.S. Gulf Policy

by Charles W. Dunne As recently as last June, the de facto alliance between Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and Egypt appeared to be in the driver’s seat of US policy on the Middle East, influencing Trump Administration thinking… Continue Reading  

What an End to Yemen’s Conflict Will Mean for the Houthis

by Hannah Porter International observers have long argued that there is no military solution to Yemen’s ongoing war, and that only political reconciliation will bring an end to four and a half years of fighting. In recent weeks, deep divisions… Continue Reading  

After Aden: Navigating Yemen’s New Political Landscape

by International Crisis Group What’s new? The anti-Huthi alliance in Yemen has reached a breaking point with southern secessionist forces taking over the interim capital, Aden, from the internationally recognised government. The government calls the move a coup and accuses the… Continue Reading  

The Houthi-Hezbollah Surrogate Nexus

by Giorgio Cafiero and Andreas Krieg Yemen’s dominant Zaydi Houthi insurgent group—Ansarullah, which in much reporting on the Yemeni crisis is often referred to as “the Houthis”—has demonstrated major advancements in drone and missile capabilities. Ansarullah’s recent attacks against the… Continue Reading