A Vote This Week Could End U.S. Role In Yemen War

27649320274_40c75cd33b_z

by Kate Kizer and William D. Hartung Yemen is in the midst of one of the greatest humanitarian disasters in modern times, and the United States and its allies in Saudi Arabia bear a large part of the responsibility. A… Continue Reading  

The Trillion-Dollar National Security Budget

170422-D-GO396-0247

by William Hartung You wouldn’t know it, based on the endless cries for more money coming from the military, politicians, and the president, but these are the best of times for the Pentagon.  Spending on the Department of Defense alone is already well… Continue Reading  

Debunking Myths that Fuel Irresponsible U.S. Defense Policy

33732488661_7de57ff5e8_z

by Colby Goodman and Taner Bertuna As President Trump continues to authorize record-breaking U.S. arms deals to Saudi Arabia and many other countries around the world and propose major increases in Pentagon spending, he is positioning himself to claim wins… Continue Reading  

Trump’s Love Affair With the Saudis

33975154473_5d2aa3a917_b

by William Hartung At this point, it’s no great surprise when Donald Trump walks away from past statements in service to some impulse of the moment. Nowhere, however, has such a shift been more extreme or its potential consequences more… Continue Reading  

Ignoring the Costs of War

Four U.S. Air Force B-1B Lancers assigned to the 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron, deployed from Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, arrive Feb. 6, 2017, at Andersen AFB, Guam. The 9th EBS is taking over U.S. Pacific Command’s Continuous Bomber Presence operations from the 34th EBS, assigned to Ellsworth Air Force Base, S.D. The B-1B’s speed and superior handling characteristics allow it to seamlessly integrate in mixed force packages. These capabilities, when combined with its substantial payload, excellent radar targeting system, long loiter time and survivability, make the B-1B a key element of any joint/composite strike force. While deployed at Guam the B-1Bs will continue conducting flight operations where international law permit. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Richard P. Ebensberger/Released)

by William Hartung When Donald Trump wanted to “do something” about the use of chemical weapons on civilians in Syria, he had the U.S. Navy lob 59 cruise missiles at a Syrian airfield (cost: $89 million). The strike was symbolic… Continue Reading