Six Steps to Make Most of Senate’s Yemen Vote

Home destroyed in Yemen war (Shutterstock)

by International Crisis Group The U.S. Congress is notoriously reluctant to take tough decisions on matters of war and peace, which makes the Senate’s 29 November vote on the conflict in Yemen all the more remarkable. The Senate voted by… Continue Reading  

U.S. Escalates against Hezbollah: Israel Happy, EU Not

Hezbollah supporters (Gabriele Pedrini via Shutterstock)

by Ali Rizk On November 13, the State department designated Jawad Nasrallah—the son of Hezbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah—a global terrorist. At the same time, the State department announced a $5 million reward for information on two Hezbollah officials, Khalil… Continue Reading  

Iran’s Economic Populism: Antidote to U.S. Pressure

Grigvovan via Shutterstock

by Kaveh L. Afrasiabi Exactly 30 years ago, I wrote a dissertation of over 500 pages on state and populism in Iran that ended with a chapter on “permanent populism.” This concept draws together various strands: the pattern of post-revolutionary… Continue Reading  

Holding Khashoggi’s Murderers Accountable with the Global Magnitsky Act

LIndsey Graham (Gage Skidmore via Flickr)

by Khalid Al-Jaber Amid the fallout of the Jamal Khashoggi saga, there is growing talk of the U.S. government using the Global Magnitsky Act to sanction certain Saudi individuals connected to the journalist’s premeditated murder. As Democrats prepare to take… Continue Reading  

Ending the Yemen War Before It Ends Yemen

James Mattis (Alexandros Michailidis via Shutterstock)

by Khalid al-Jaber Defense Secretary James Mattis’s recent comment on the war in Yemen is the strongest U.S. statement since the war’s inception in March 2015. “We’ve got to replace combat with compromise,” Mattis said at the United States Institute… Continue Reading