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The Enduring Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

by Paul R. Pillar President Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, whom the...

Analysis UNSC_Summit

Published on December 9th, 2014 | by Guest

10

Israeli Nukes Meets Atomic Irony in the Middle East

by Paul R. Pillar

The stated rationale for the United States casting on Tuesday one of the very lonely votes it sometimes casts at the United Nations General Assembly, on matters on which almost the entire world sees things differently, warrants some reflection. The resolution in question this time endorsed the creation of a nuclear weapons-free zone in the Middle East and called on Israel to join the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, to renounce any possession of nuclear weapons, and to put its nuclear facilities under the safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency. A nuclear weapons-free Middle East and universal adherence to the nonproliferation treaty are supposedly U.S. policy objectives, and have been for many years. So why did the United States oppose the resolution? According to the U.S. representative’s statement in earlier debate, the resolution “fails to meet the fundamental tests of fairness and balance. It confines itself to expressions of concern about the activities of a single country.”

You know something doesn’t wash when the contrary views are as overwhelmingly held as on this matter. The resolution passed on a vote of 161-5. Joining Israel and the United States as “no” votes were Canada (maybe the Harper government was thinking of the Keystone XL pipeline issue being in the balance?) and the Pacific powers of Micronesia and Palau. The latter two habitually cast their UN votes to stay in the good graces of the United States; they have been among the few abstainers on the even more lopsided votes in the General Assembly each year calling for an end to the U.S. embargo of Cuba.

An obvious problem with the United States complaining about a resolution on a topic such as this being an expression of concern about the activities of only a single country is that the United States has been in front in pushing for United Nations resolutions about the nuclear activities of a single country, only just not about the particular country involved this time. The inconsistency is glaring. Iran has been the single-country focus of several U.S.-backed resolutions on nuclear matters—resolutions in the Security Council that have been the basis for international sanctions against Iran.

One could look, but would look in vain, for sound rationales for the inconsistency. If anything, the differences one would find should point U.S. policy in the opposite direction from the direction it has taken. It is Iran that has placed itself under the obligations of the nonproliferation treaty and subjects its nuclear activities to international inspection. Since the preliminary agreement to restrict Iran’s nuclear program that was negotiated last year, those inspections are more frequent and intrusive than ever. Israel, by contrast, has kept its nuclear activities completely out of the reach of any international inspection or control regime. As for actual nuclear weapons, Iran does not have them, has declared its intention not to have them, and according to the U.S. intelligence community has not made any decision to make them. Neither Israel nor the United States says publicly that Israel has nuclear weapons, but just about everyone else in the world takes it as a given that it does, which would make it the only state in the Middle East that does.

One might look, but still in vain, for justifying discrepancies that go beyond the respective nuclear programs of the countries in question but still involve questions of regional security and stability. What about, for example, menacing threats? Iran and Israel have each had plenty of unfriendly words about each other. Iran’s words have included bloviation about wiping something from pages of history; Israel’s have included more pointed threats of military attack. What about actual attacks? Israel has initiated multiple wars with its neighbors, as well as launching smaller armed attacks; The Islamic Republic of Iran has not started a war in its 35-year history. Terrorism? Well, there were those assassinations of Iranian scientists, with some later attacks against Israelis being an obvious (and not very successful) attempt by Iran at a tit-for-tat response against those responsible for murdering the scientists. And so forth.

Singling out one country in a multilateral context can indeed cause problems. The resolution the General Assembly passed this week need not involve a problem, however, since it was not calling for differential treatment of anyone—only for Israel to get with the same program as any state in the Middle East that does not have nukes and adheres to the international nuclear control regime.

Iran, by contrast, is being treated much differently from anyone else. Tehran already has acquiesced to some of that differential treatment, but Iranians unsurprisingly wonder why Iran should be subjected to more such treatment, or indeed to any of it. They wonder, for example, why Iran should be subject to unique restrictions that several other non-nuclear-weapons states that also are parties to the nonproliferation treaty and enrich their own uranium are not. Such wonderment is almost certainly a factor in Iranian resistance to making the sorts of additional concessions that many in the United States are expecting or demanding that Iran make. The differential treatment should be kept in mind in any discussion in the United States about who has made bigger concessions than whom and about what would or would not constitute a fair and reasonable final agreement.

Then there is the irony—although Iranians might use a more bitter word than irony—of Israel leading the charge in constantly agitating about Iran’s nuclear program (and by trying to torpedo an international agreement to restrict that program, making the issue fester and thus making it more possible for Israel’s agitation to go on forever).

This article was first published by the National Interest and was reprinted here with permission.

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10 Responses to Israeli Nukes Meets Atomic Irony in the Middle East

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  1. Iran has the world’s sanest policy on nuclear weapons. To quote the Supreme Leader:

    “The Iranian nation has never pursued and will never pursue nuclear weapons. There is no doubt that the decision makers in the countries opposing us know well that Iran is not after nuclear weapons because the Islamic Republic, logically, religiously and theoretically, considers the possession of nuclear weapons a grave sin and believes the proliferation of such weapons is senseless, destructive and dangerous.”

    At this web address: there are scores of statements by dozens of religious and political leaders over several decades saying the same thing about Iranian policy.

    As to the “possible military dimension” of the Iranian nuclear program before 2003, the mostly likely explanation for this is that given by a former French ambassador to Iran: this was an unauthorised program which was discovered and closed down by Rouhani when he became nuclear policy chief in 2003

  2. avatar Norman says:

    Thank you Mr Pillar for the input. Irony, yes, that the U.S. continues the charade of wanting peace in the M.E. or anywhere else it has a footprint. Your last paragraph puts the issue into perspective, but it seems the U.S. is indeed, a lap dog of Israel, conformation confirmed to the world.

  3. Apologies to LobeLog for not reading the comment policy and trying to include links. In my earlier post at the top of the comments, the scores of statements about the Iranian policy are on the blog “wideasleepinamerica.com” at “/2012/10/the-goldberg-predilections-ignoring.html”.

    The French ambassador’s remarks are on the “newyorktimes.com” at “/2013/07/27/opinion/global/rouhani-and-the-iranian-bomb.html”

  4. avatar James Canning says:

    The US’s failure to support a nuke-free zone in the Middle East is pathetic, and dangerous. And contrary to the national security interests of the American people.

  5. avatar Monty Ahwazi says:

    Israel doesn’t have any nuclear arsenal! The claim is a political bluff and the US officials know it. The false claim is used to keep Arabs in fear and to deter them from ganging up together and have an all out military offensive against Israel. My 2 cents!


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